Chapter

Glasgow

Ian Simpson Ross

in The Life of Adam Smith

Published in print October 1995 | ISBN: 9780198288213
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191596827 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198288212.003.0003
 Glasgow

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Glasgow had a number of advantages as the place of Smith's university education beginning in 1737. Expenses were moderate and important reforms had been implemented in 1727, which put the teaching of logic and metaphysics, moral philosophy, and natural philosophy (physics) on a thoroughly modern basis. As well, regulations were made for an arts curriculum including the ancient classics, philosophy, also mathematics and Newtonian science, which provided a firm grounding in cultural and intellectual values for subsequent careers in the professions. Smith noticed the natural beauty of Glasgow's setting, also the emerging industries and thronged local markets, plus the transatlantic shipping in the Clyde estuary, which gave the city a rising economy, contrasting it with Kirkcaldy's declining one.

Keywords: economy; industries; mathematics; philosophy; transatlantic

Chapter.  5286 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of Economic Thought

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