Chapter

Overstrong Against Thyself: War, the State, and Growth in Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution

J. Bradford De Long

in A Not-so-dismal Science

Published in print January 2000 | ISBN: 9780198294900
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191596728 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198294905.003.0006
 Overstrong Against Thyself: War, the State, and Growth in Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution

Show Summary Details

Preview

A historical analysis of early modern Western Europe demonstrates that it was the interests of princes and kings, and the forms of government, that mainly determined whether there was economic growth or stagnation—and that these even partly explain the Industrial Revolution. The different parts of the chapter discuss prince‐ and merchant‐dominated city states in pre‐industrial Europe, the military revolution (with sections on the decline of Spain, and the stagnation of the Dutch Republic), and the anomaly of Britain as the only nation state that continued to grow its economy under the burden of maintaining the military effort required of an early modern European great power.

Keywords: city states; economic growth; Europe; government; history; Industrial Revolution; kings; military revolution; Netherlands princes; Spain; UK; Western Europe

Chapter.  11587 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Economic Systems

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.