Chapter

The Patriot Game: Rhetoric and Heresthetic in the Anglo‐Irish Treaty Negotiations of 1921

Iain McLean

in Rational Choice and British Politics

Published in print April 2001 | ISBN: 9780198295297
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191599873 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198295294.003.0007
 The Patriot Game: Rhetoric and Heresthetic in the Anglo‐Irish Treaty Negotiations of 1921

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The second of two case studies of Lloyd George. Explains how he was able to enact the Irish Treaty of 1921 in three parliaments and three executives, when he controlled a majority in only one of the six bodies, and that a very bare majority. Although his threat strategy was not credible, he forced the Irish delegate into a sequential game, because each Irish delegate, when forced to decide, in turn strictly preferred signing the Treaty to not signing it. Lloyd George succeeded in removing the Irish question from British politics for fifty years, and partly succeeded in removing the British question from Irish politics.

Keywords: British–Irish Treaty 1921; executive; David Lloyd George; majority; parliament; sequential game; threat strategy

Chapter.  14993 words. 

Subjects: UK Politics

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