Chapter

Divided Governance: The Case of Denmark

John Fitzmaurice

in Divided Government in Comparative Perspective

Published in print November 2001 | ISBN: 9780198295655
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191599149 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0198295650.003.0008

Series: Comparative Politics

 Divided Governance: The Case of Denmark

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As a result of a combination of specific characteristics of the Danish political system, such as the fragmentation of the Folketing, especially since 1973, Denmark has developed a tendency towards weak minority governments and even minority coalitions, and a cooperative, pragmatic political culture. These forms of divided government have arisen not so much out of formal institutional arrangements, as out of a Danish electoral predilection for holding the reigns of power by not passing too much of it to any majoritarian party. Their degree of success has varied over recent years, with a consequent variation in the extent to which the country has suffered from divided government.

Keywords: Denmark; divided government

Chapter.  9526 words. 

Subjects: Comparative Politics

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