Chapter

Why Revolutions Happen

Vladimir Mau and Irina Starodubrovskaya

in The Challenge of Revolution

Published in print February 2001 | ISBN: 9780199241507
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191599835 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199241503.003.0002
 Why Revolutions Happen

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The study of the great revolutions of the past shows that they occur in countries that encounter fundamental challenges, which may be a consequence of local or of global processes, to which their institutional structures and the psychological outlook of the populations have rendered them unable to adapt themselves in the time available. This incapacity to adapt manifests itself in a progressive narrowing of remedial options that might, were the state stronger, produce sufficiently robust policies to remove the internal constraints that impede the adaptation required. The result is a sequence of fragmentation and breakdown processes, which the state is increasingly powerless to resist.

Keywords: theory of revolution

Chapter.  14719 words. 

Subjects: Comparative Politics

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