Chapter

Constantius' Double Council of Unity

Henry Chadwick

in The Church in Ancient Society

Published in print December 2001 | ISBN: 9780199246953
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600463 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199246955.003.0036

Series: Oxford History of the Christian Church

 Constantius' Double Council of Unity

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Constantius II organized councils in 359–60 for the acceptance of the Dated Creed, the western bishops meeting at Ariminium (Rimini), and the easterners at Seleucia. The majority in the west adhered to the Nicene Creed, and agreement imposed by Constantius was seen as a compromise and against the rights of the see of Rome as the ultimate judge of truth in the Church. The eastern council was bitterly divided: one party was persuaded by the emperor to accept the western formula; the other held a rival council in Constantinople. When the see of Antioch became vacant, the claims and differences of rival claimants created a schism with long‐lasting consequences.

Keywords: Antioch; church councils; church unity; popes

Chapter.  7406 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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