Chapter

Kant's <i>Groundwork</i> III Argument Reconsidered

Karl Ameriks

in Interpreting Kant's Critiques

Published in print August 2003 | ISBN: 9780199247318
Published online January 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780191601699 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199247315.003.0010
 Kant's Groundwork III Argument Reconsidered

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Provides a detailed critical account of the beginning of the argument of part III of Kant’s Groundwork, the section of his writing in which he seems to come closest to offering a direct proof of our absolute freedom. It contends that there are several ambiguities and missteps in what seems to be Kant’s main line of argument here, but these need not count again Kant’s ultimate position. On the contrary, realizing that there may be such fundamental flaws in this part of the Groundwork is the easiest way to understand why Kant never directly refers back to it and why he reversed his method of presentation so dramatically in the second Critique.

Keywords: causality; deduction; freedom; morality; will

Chapter.  12083 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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