Chapter

Theophany, Anthropomorphism, and the Imago Dei: Some Observations About the Incarnation in the Light of the Old Testament

J. Andrew Dearman

in The Incarnation

Published in print May 2002 | ISBN: 9780199248452
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600524 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199248451.003.0002
 Theophany, Anthropomorphism, and the Imago Dei: Some Observations About the Incarnation in the Light of the Old Testament

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Andrew Dearman examines two elements in the OT: the anthropomorphic presentation of God in theophany and the creation of humankind in the imago Dei. Anthropomorphism was a way that divine presence could be apprehended by people, and theomorphism indicated both a basis on which humankind understood its divinely mandated tasks and one way in which the divine‐human relationship could be represented. In spite of anti‐anthropomorphic traditions elsewhere in the OT, these two elements influenced the presentation of Christ in the early church and both may contribute to a modern understanding of the incarnation.

Keywords: Anthropomorphism; Dearman; early church; imago Dei; theomorphism

Chapter.  7322 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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