Chapter

Feminism and the Transgressing of Canonical Boundaries

William J. Abraham

in Canon and Criterion in Christian Theology

Published in print January 2002 | ISBN: 9780199250035
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600388 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199250030.003.0016
 Feminism and the Transgressing of Canonical Boundaries

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Feminist theology began in part by making soteriology rather than epistemology central in its vision of canon. Unhappily scripture was, it was believed, deeply compromised as a means of liberation; hence other canonical materials were needed to secure salvation. The result was the creation of virtually a full‐scale competing canonical heritage to that developed in the Church. This was correlated with fresh epistemological proposals that reflected the continued captivity of the Church to changes in epistemology. More recently, feminist theologians have sought to retrieve scripture and the canonical doctrines of the Church as salutary and liberating.

Keywords: canonical heritage; epistemology; feminist theology; liberation; soteriology

Chapter.  14168 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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