Chapter

Communicative Practices and Communicative Demands in the Environmental Justice Movement

David Schlosberg

in Environmental Justice and the New Pluralism

Published in print August 2002 | ISBN: 9780199256419
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191600203 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199256411.003.0006
Communicative Practices and Communicative Demands in the Environmental Justice Movement

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An exploration is made of how the environmental justice movement in the United States has taken on some of the communicative and participatory demands and practices of critical pluralism. The movement has been critical of the communicative methods of the mainstream – the top-down organizational structure and its one-way nature of communication, and the lack of attention to issues of public participation in policy-making – and issues of communication have been a central focus in the development and demands of environmental justice. Accepting the diversity and the situated experiences of individuals and cultures has fostered the use of, and demand for, a variety of innovative communicative processes. Internally, the movement has attempted to employ more open discursive processes, paying particular attention to communication within and across diverse groups. Externally, the movement has made demands with regard to issues of communication and more discursive and participatory policy-making on government agencies, particularly the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Keywords: communication; communicative demands; communicative methods; communicative practices; communicative processes; critical pluralism; environmental justice; environmental justice movement; government agencies; open discursive processes; participatory demands; participatory practices; pluralism; policy-making; public participation; United States; US Environmental Protection Agency

Chapter.  13237 words. 

Subjects: Environment

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