Chapter

Belief, Confidence, and the Method of Science

Christopher Hookway

in Truth, Rationality, and Pragmatism

Published in print December 2002 | ISBN: 9780199256587
Published online November 2003 | e-ISBN: 9780191597718 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199256586.003.0002
Belief, Confidence, and the Method of Science

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A discussion of Peirce's claim that belief has no place in science and his views of the different roles of rational self‐control in dealing with scientific matters and with ‘vital questions’. This appears to be in conflict with Peirce's defence of the scientific method as the best method for the fixation of belief. There is also discussion of Peirce's claim that the laws of logic are regulative ideas, or hopes.

Keywords: fixation of belief; hope; Peirce; practices; regulative idea; scientific method; theory; vital questions

Chapter.  10802 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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