Chapter

CHAPTER 4 CHAPTER 4 Emotions in Fourteenth‐Century Emotions in Fourteenth‐Century Philosophy

Simo Knuuttila

in Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

Published in print July 2004 | ISBN: 9780199266388
Published online January 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780191601750 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199266387.003.0005
CHAPTER 4 CHAPTER 4 Emotions in Fourteenth‐Century Emotions in Fourteenth‐Century Philosophy

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Section 1 describes some psychological themes which were found interesting by many early fourteenth‐century thinkers, such as intuitive knowledge, self‐awareness, other reflexive acts, and voluntarism. Section 2 deals with the influential voluntarist theory of emotions in John Duns Scotus and William Ockham and their followers. As distinct from the received view, it was argued that there are also emotions of the will, such as the unpremeditated acts of complacence and dislike and non‐voluntarily felt pleasures or distresses. Adam Wodeham's discussion of the different views of emotions in Oxford in the 1320s is dealt with in Sect. 3, and some late medieval themes which influenced early modern theories in Sect. 4.

Keywords: awareness; complacence; dislike; voluntarist theory; will

Chapter.  14892 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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