Chapter

SELF‐CONSCIOUSNESS AND PRACTICAL RESPONSIBILITY

David O. Brink

in Perfectionism and the Common Good

Published in print October 2003 | ISBN: 9780199266401
Published online April 2004 | e-ISBN: 9780191600906 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199266409.003.0009

Series: Lines of Thought

SELF‐CONSCIOUSNESS AND PRACTICAL RESPONSIBILITY

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This chapter focuses on Green's arguments about the role of self-consciousness in practical responsibility or moral personality. Green denies that moral responsibility is threatened by determinism and requires indeterminism. He believes that indeterminism is a greater threat to responsibility, inasmuch as it is unclear why we should hold a person accountable for actions that are not due to his character. Green shows the influence of a long tradition of thinking about agency that extends back to the Greeks and is given forceful articulation by moderns, such as Butler, Reid, and Kant.

Keywords: T. H. Green; moral personality; determinism; indeterminisn; Butler; Reid; Kant

Chapter.  1249 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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