Chapter

PURSUIT OF A PERSONAL GOOD

David O. Brink

in Perfectionism and the Common Good

Published in print October 2003 | ISBN: 9780199266401
Published online April 2004 | e-ISBN: 9780191600906 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199266409.003.0011

Series: Lines of Thought

PURSUIT OF A PERSONAL GOOD

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This chapter focuses on Green's views about personal good. He believes that the responsible agent acts not simply on appetites or passions, but as the result of ought judgements or in light of a conception of goods. He also says that the deliberating agent takes the object of reflectively endorsed desire as his own good, indeed, his own greatest good, and that he aims at ‘self-satisfaction’. Green thinks that the agent's own good includes the good of others and that this undermines the popular contrast between self-love and altruism. It is argued that if these claims can be defended, then the egoist interpretation of the aim of responsible action should not be rejected on the grounds that it is inconsistent with a concern for the good of others or a willingness to engage in self-sacrifice.

Keywords: T. H. Green; pursuit of goods; greatest good; egoist

Chapter.  1029 words. 

Subjects: History of Western Philosophy

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