Chapter

<b>The Humanitarian Responsibilities of Sovereignty: Explaining the Development of a New Norm of Military Intervention for Humanitarian Purposes in International Society</b>

Nicholas J. Wheeler

in Humanitarian Intervention and International Relations

Published in print December 2003 | ISBN: 9780199267217
Published online April 2004 | e-ISBN: 9780191601118 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199267219.003.0003
The Humanitarian Responsibilities of Sovereignty: Explaining the Development of a New Norm of Military Intervention for Humanitarian Purposes in International Society

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Argues that we are witnessing the development of a new norm of military intervention for humanitarian purposes in contemporary international society. Since the end of the Cold War, the United Nations Security Council has been more active in the realm of intervention, extending its Chapter VII powers into matters that had previously belonged to the domestic jurisdiction of states. Without the material power of Western states, this activism would not have been possible. However, a purely materialist explanation for this development fails to consider the changed normative context within Western states that permitted, and in some cases encouraged, intervention. While normative evolution has occurred, it is also limited in its scope, specifically over the question of whether military intervention must have Security Council authorization.

Keywords: ‘safe havens’; ‘war against terrorism’; Chapter VII (United Nations Charter); constructivism; domestic jurisdiction; Kofi Annan; Kosovo; Kurds; legitimacy; mitigation; neo-Marxism; Nicholas Wheeler; norms; northern Iraq; Permanent Five (P5); power; realism; Resolution 688; Resolution 794; Rwanda; shaming; social power; Somalia; sovereignty as responsibility; unilateralism; United Nations Security Council

Chapter.  11169 words. 

Subjects: International Relations

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