Chapter

Perceptual Specialization and the Definition of Colour

Mohan Matthen

in Seeing, Doing, and Knowing

Published in print February 2005 | ISBN: 9780199268504
Published online April 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780191602283 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199268509.003.0007
Perceptual Specialization and the Definition of Colour

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Because of perceptual specialization in different species of animals, colour cannot be defined in terms of either the physical properties that human colour vision captures or the sense experiences that it produces in humans. Thus, there is no ecologically characterized class of properties such that colour vision must consist (in whatsoever kind of organism it may occur) in the capture of some or all of the members of this class. Nor is there any subjectively characterized class of experiences such that colour vision must consist (in whatsoever kind of organism it may occur) of having some or all of these experiences.

Keywords: anthropocentrism; colour; constancy; David Lewis; functionalism; opponent processing; phenomenology; realism; sensory classification; sensory specialization

Chapter.  11583 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Mind

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