Chapter

Immigrants and the Welfare State in Europe

Martin Baldwin-Edwards

in International Migration

Published in print March 2004 | ISBN: 9780199269006
Published online August 2004 | e-ISBN: 9780191601309 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199269009.003.0017

Series: International Studies in Demography

 Immigrants and the Welfare State in Europe

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Social protections for immigrants in EU countries are fragmented and tenuous: not only is the variation between countries great but so is the protection afforded in different phases of the immigrant life cycle for immigrants of different legal statuses and nationalities. European welfare regimes reflect not only citizenship conceptions and other ideologies but also principles of inclusion and exclusion. The relationship of immigrants to welfare systems is either accidental (structural toleration), juridical (international treaties and human rights case law), or ideological (active immigrant policies). These piecemeal adaptations of welfare systems to immigrants are complex and costly to implement, but it is doubtful that European countries will be able to escape their histories of racial exclusion and construct inclusive, market‐based welfare systems.

Keywords: illegal migrants; immigrant rights; immigrants; refugees; social protections; social welfare; welfare state

Chapter.  7592 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Economic Systems

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