Chapter

<b>9</b> <b>9</b> <b> <i>Research in Schools</i> </b>

Lainie Friedman Ross

in Children in Medical Research

Published in print February 2006 | ISBN: 9780199273287
Published online May 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603655 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199273286.003.0010

Series: Issues in Biomedical Ethics

 9   9    Research in Schools

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This chapter examines the arguments for and against conducting biomedical and behavioral research in schools; whether additional human subject protections are necessary; and whose consent is necessary and how it should be procured. It is argued that while schools are a tempting venue to do biomedical and behavioral research, parents, students, teachers, school officials, researchers, and institutional review boards need to be sensitive to the unique problems that such research may raise. Schools should have written policies that address the need to protect human subjects when research is done in the school setting. Minimum guidelines for schools are presented.

Keywords: biomedical research; behavioral research; schools; children; pediatric research

Chapter.  7512 words. 

Subjects: Moral Philosophy

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