Chapter

Summary and Prospect

Margaret Gilbert

in A Theory of Political Obligation

Published in print May 2006 | ISBN: 9780199274956
Published online September 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603976 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199274959.003.0012
 Summary and Prospect

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The book’s argument is summarized and its conclusions are brought to hear on two classic situations of crisis: Socrates awaiting the death penalty in prison, and Antigone in her conflict with the ruler of her political society, Creon. Emphasis is given to the point that though obligations of joint commitment are absolute in the sense discussed, and supersede one’s personal inclinations and self-interest as such, it is possible for other considerations to ‘trump’ them. Antigone believed there were such considerations in her case; Socrates seems not to have thought so. A number of avenues for further empirical investigation and moral inquiry are noted.

Keywords: Antigone; death penalty; empirical investigation; moral inquiry; plural subject theory; political obligation; political society; ruler; self-interest; Socrates

Chapter.  4872 words. 

Subjects: Social and Political Philosophy

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