Chapter

<b>Asceticism as Locus of Authority: The Case of Peter the Iberian</b>

Cornelia B. Horn

in Asceticism and Christological Controversy in Fifth-Century Palestine

Published in print March 2006 | ISBN: 9780199277537
Published online September 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191604171 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199277532.003.0004

Series: Oxford Early Christian Studies

 Asceticism as Locus of Authority: The Case of Peter the Iberian

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This chapter demonstrates how ascetics gained authority, and used this to promote adherence to the particular religious group with which they were affiliated. It addresses those issues of authority, which surfaced in the anti-Chalcedonian ascetic milieu in the 5th and early 6th centuries in the patriarchates of Jerusalem, Alexandria, and Antioch, focusing on the people and events pertaining to Peter the Iberian’s life and career. It examines ascetic influences to which Peter was exposed during the formative years of his life, starting in Georgia, then in Constantinople, and, eventually, in a highly concentrated and direct way in the Holy Land. The specific ascetic style which Peter appears to have developed and which his biographer Rufus further worked out in the literary portrait of Peter is highlighted.

Keywords: asceticism; Peter the Iberian; anti-Chalcedonian ascetic; authority; resistance

Chapter.  56332 words. 

Subjects: Early Christianity

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