Chapter

INTENTION AND THE CREATION OF ART

Paisley Livingston

in Art and Intention

Published in print February 2005 | ISBN: 9780199278060
Published online April 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780191602269 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199278067.003.0002
INTENTION AND THE CREATION OF ART

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An examination of the functions of intention in the making of art begins with the contrast between inspirationist and rationalist perspectives on artistic creativity. As an alternative, Livingston emphasizes the blending of spontaneous and deliberate, planned and unintentional moments in the creative process. Intentions are necessary to art-making and are linked to the assumption that a work of art is always evaluable in terms of one kind of potential artistic value—artistry or virtuosity. Intentions are linked to artists’ projects, to the distinction between complete and incomplete works of art, as well as to the several senses of ‘fragment’ in critical discourse.

Keywords: artistic value; automatic writing; creation of art; inspiration; intention; fragment; work of art

Chapter.  13451 words. 

Subjects: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art

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