Chapter

Maternal Mortality as an Indicator of the Standard of Living in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Slavonia

Eugene A. Hammel and Aaron Gullickson

in Living Standards in the Past

Published in print March 2005 | ISBN: 9780199280681
Published online July 2005 | e-ISBN: 9780191602467 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199280681.003.0012
 Maternal Mortality as an Indicator of the Standard of Living in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Slavonia

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This study of maternal mortality on the Croatian-Bosnian border in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries shows that the chance of death in childbirth was sensitive to major changes in the social and economic system. Death was more likely when men were called to military duty, in military rather than civil parishes even in peacetime, and over time as wage labour increased and as economies of scale were lost as the joint household system decayed. The unifying factor in all of these influences is the withdrawal of male labour from family farming, placing greater burdens on pregnant and parturient women and on those other women who might nurture them.

Keywords: Croatia; family systems; household economy; kinship support; maternal mortality; monetization

Chapter.  12954 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Economic History

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