Chapter

<b>Quantification and its Discontents</b>

Henry Laycock

in Words without Objects

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780199281718
Published online May 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603594 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199281718.003.0005
 Quantification and its Discontents

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The chapter focuses on quantification as it figures in standard versions of the predicate calculus. These versions are straightforwardly reductive in that non-singular sentences must be re-cast into singular form if they are to receive representation. However, various non-singular sentences, including certain kinds of plural sentences, are refractory to representation in this form. Essentially singular forms of quantifier-expression must be distinguished from non-singular forms to lay the basis for sui generis non-singular forms of quantification, appropriate to both plural nouns and non-count nouns. The maxim ‘to be is to be the value of a variable’ must be rejected.

Keywords: predicate calculus; non-singular quantification; reduction; non-singular variable; instance; sample

Chapter.  10227 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Language

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