Chapter

Priority, Posteriority, and Causality

Rory Fox

in Time and Eternity in Mid-Thirteenth-Century Thought

Published in print April 2006 | ISBN: 9780199285754
Published online May 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603563 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199285756.003.0004

Series: Oxford Theological Monographs

Priority, Posteriority, and Causality

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This chapter focuses on the other two temporal relations: temporally before (temporal priority) and temporally after (temporal posteriority), examining the notions in themselves before turning to the related question of 13th century attitudes to the causal theory of time. Thirteenth-century accounts of simultaneous causation undermine the possibility that 13th century thinkers would have accepted that temporal relations could be reduced to more fundamental causal relations, since the existence of simultaneous causation implies that causal orderings and temporal orderings could be uncoupled. The notion of backwards causation is also explored as part of the general investigation of causation and causal sequences.

Keywords: temporal priority; temporal posteriority; causal theory; causation; time; 13th century

Chapter.  11330 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Religion

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