Chapter

Long‐Term Policy Regimes: Incrementalism Put in Context

Michael D. McDonald and Ian Budge

in Elections, Parties, Democracy

Published in print October 2005 | ISBN: 9780199286720
Published online February 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603327 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199286728.003.0010

Series: Comparative Politics

Long‐Term Policy Regimes: Incrementalism Put in Context

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Policy outcomes are rather stable while politics in the short-term are in a state of flux — one which oscillates round long-term equilibrium point which is fairly stable within each country. Such well-established policy positions distinguish long-term policy regimes within each country. To change these, governments need popular support over fairly long periods of time, which usually is not forthcoming. Typically, actual policy outputs oscillate round a long-term equilibrium, which does not change very much over a four or five election period.

Keywords: policy regimes; long term policy; national norms; policy equilibrium; long term stability; oscillations; national differences; incrementalism

Chapter.  4494 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Comparative Politics

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