Chapter

<b>Experience and causation</b>

Richard Gaskin

in Experience and the World's Own Language

Published in print February 2006 | ISBN: 9780199287253
Published online September 2006 | e-ISBN: 9780191603969 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/0199287252.003.0002
 Experience and causation

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McDowell’s appeal to causation is problematic. In order to make sense of causal relations linking world and experience (or judgement), he has to identify a species of causation that is in the space of reasons — causation that not only brings about, but also rationalizes its effects. But he does not elucidate this notion. In effect, he simply asserts that there is such a species and that there is a place for second nature (nature structured by relations of normativity) in a world otherwise permeated by first nature (nature structured by nomological relations). Mere assertion is not a substitute for an account of what space-of-reasons causation (second nature) is and how it is possible. We need to know how space-of-reasons causation (second nature) relates to and emerged from realm-of-law causation (first nature).

Keywords: causation; world; experience; space of reasons; first nature; second nature

Chapter.  17785 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Language

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