Journal Article

God and the global economy: religion and attitudes towards trade and immigration in the United States

Joseph P. Daniels and Marc von der Ruhr

in Socio-Economic Review

Published on behalf of Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics

Volume 3, issue 3, pages 467-489
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 1475-1461
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1475-147X | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/SER/mwi020
God and the global economy: religion and attitudes towards trade and immigration in the United States

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  • Moral Philosophy
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Using the results of a national identity survey, we test the impact of religious affiliation on trade and immigration-policy preferences of US residents while controlling for individual level of skill, political ideology and other important demographic characteristics. Our results show that religion is an important determinant of international-policy preferences as individuals who are pre-Vatican II Catholic or members of a fundamentalist Protestant denomination are more likely to prefer policies that restrict imports and immigration. Religiosity, in contrast, has a separate effect of moderating attitudes towards immigration. In addition, we find evidence of denominational effects among African Americans in that members of fundamentalist denominations tend to favour policies that restrict imports while others do not, implying that statistical results commonly attributed to racial effects may actually be a religion effect.

Keywords: religion; trade; immigration; policy preferences; JEL classification: F0, H0

Journal Article.  7672 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Moral Philosophy ; Corporate Social Responsibility ; Welfare Economics ; Political Economy ; Economic Sociology

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