Chapter

What does it Mean?

P. R. Ackroyd and G. N. Stanton

in Introducing the Old Testament

Published in print March 1990 | ISBN: 9780192132543
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191670053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192132543.003.0004

Series: Oxford Bible Series

What does it Mean?

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This chapter is concerned with the meanings of the Old Testament and related issues. It tries to answer questions such as its reliability, originality, corruption, and the trajectory of its composition over the long period of history. We are mostly ignorant as to the actual circumstances of the composition of all the books of the Old Testament. Some parts of the Old Testament came to be associated with particular individuals like Torah with Moses, the Psalms with David. Some other parts are linked with a particular prophetic figure. In terms of textual criticism, three types of approaches have been widely accepted. One of the characteristics of the textual criticism is that a change is needed in the actual wording of the text as it has come down to us.

Keywords: Old Testament; reliability; corruption; Torah; textual criticism

Chapter.  5312 words. 

Subjects: Biblical Studies

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