Chapter

Spinal injury and spinal cord blood-flow: the effect of early treatment and local cooling

Robert R. Hansebout

in Spinal Cord Dysfunction: Volume II: Intervention and Treatment

Published in print December 1991 | ISBN: 9780192617873
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191724312 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192617873.003.0004
Spinal injury and spinal cord blood-flow: the effect of early treatment and local cooling

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The role of blood-flow in the acute spinal cord injury is controversial. Local cord cooling has been used to treat experimental spinal cord injury during the last fifteen years. It has shown beneficial effects in promoting the return of function after a severe injury. Spinal cord blood-flow can be measured internally, using hydrogen polarography. Using this technique in the nontraumatized spinal cord of dogs, local cooling was found to markedly decrease the internal spinal cord blood-flow. It is therefore conceivable that, following acute trauma, cooling reduces the passage of noxious substances from blood-vessels into the cord tissues, and thereby has beneficial effects.

Keywords: spinal injury; spinal chord blood-flow; local cord cooling; hydrogen polarography; acute trauma; noxious substances

Chapter.  7231 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience

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