Chapter

Disturbance of the 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in ageing and in Alzheimer's and vascular dementias

C. G. Gottfries

in 5-Hydroxytryptamine in Psychiatry

Published in print February 1991 | ISBN: 9780192620118
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191724725 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192620118.003.0022
Disturbance of the 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in ageing and in Alzheimer's and vascular dementias

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Syndromes of cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor disturbance in the elderly that are of disabling severity are called dementias and are classified as idiopathic, vascular (VD), and secondary dementias. The main groups of idiopathic dementias (primary degenerative or metabolic disturbances) are those of Alzheimer type. Originally Alzheimer's disease (AD) was the name of an early onset dementia with characteristic cortical lesions. However, similar neuropathological findings are made in the brains of patients with senile dementia; therefore, this group was named senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT). The two forms are often brought into one group, Alzheimer-type dementia (AD/SDAT). Vascular dementia is diagnosed when there is an assumed causal relationship between vascular disorders and the appearance of dementia. Multiinfarct dementia (MID) is a subgroup of VD characterized by a temporary relationship between stroke attacks and the appearance of dementia. This chapter aims to review data indicating disturbance of the 5-HT system in patients with AD/SDAT and non-MID VD. Data about changes in the 5-HT metabolism in ageing are also reported.

Keywords: psychomotor disturbance; dementias; cortical lesions; Alzheimer's disease; vascular dementias; 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism

Chapter.  5760 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience

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