Chapter

The Bonds of Society

Glanmor Williams

in Renewal and Reformation

Published in print January 1993 | ISBN: 9780192852779
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191670558 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192852779.003.0004

Series: History of Wales

The Bonds of Society

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The demography of Wales in the later Middle Ages is shrouded by darkness. Population dropped in Wales mainly due to disease and war. The extended process by which Wales was conquered had lasted from the end of the eleventh century to 1282–3. In spite of all the rancour and prejudice that English and Welsh peoples had for one another, they were being thrown closer together in a number of ways. There were two sorts of aristocrats recognized in Wales: the native Welsh ‘barons’ and the English peerage. The peerages were standing superior than the ‘barons’ and the baronial families died out and were replaced by the peerages. Having a personal service was a sign of improved standard of living. Tournament and hunting, both related to warfare, were an obsession in their society.

Keywords: demography; Wales; Middle Ages; hunting; barons; English peerage

Chapter.  12867 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

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