Chapter

Poets and Travellers

William St. Clair

in Lord Elgin and the Marbles

Third edition

Published in print June 1998 | ISBN: 9780192880536
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191670596 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192880536.003.0017
Poets and Travellers

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Before Lord Byron went on to explore the Mediterranean, he was still young and had yet to be recognized as an artist. This was the time when he wrote English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. This manuscript was rejected by some of the regular publishers in London. After that, Byron contacted a fringe publisher whose name was James Cawthorn. The result was that the first edition was published anonymously while the next three editions acknowledged him as an author. When Byron returned home, he ordered that a fifth edition be printed and the poem be suppressed since it would be unfair to his fellow authors. This was the start of the time of illegal reproduction. Byron was somehow able to cause damage to Elgin because of the way that he had addressed Elgin earlier. This chapter shows Byron as the epitome of what was referred to as the milodros or travelling gentleman.

Keywords: publication; Lord Byron; milodros; travelling gentleman; English Bards and Scotch Reviewers

Chapter.  8623 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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