Chapter

Conclusion

Roderick Floud

in The People and the British Economy, 1830–1914

Published in print April 1997 | ISBN: 9780192892102
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191670602 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780192892102.003.0013
Conclusion

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This concluding chapter argues that the myth of the golden Victorian and Edwardian years can be misleading, even dangerously so, if it is allied to a denigration of the British economy and society in the 20th century. It leads then to a search for scapegoats who can be blamed for the apparent fall from the high peaks of Britain's imperial glory. It is important to remember that, however substantial the achievements of the period from 1830 to 1914, Britain's economic growth in the 20th century has been faster and greater. At the same time, British society has become more civilized, more tolerant, and more equal than it was at any time in the Victorian or Edwardian age.

Keywords: Britain; civilization; economic growth; Edwardian period; Victorian period; tolerance; equality

Chapter.  1032 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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