Chapter

Class, Culture, and Immigrant Group Identity in the United States: The Case of Irish-American Ethnicity

Kerby A. Miller

in Immigration Reconsidered

Published in print January 1991 | ISBN: 9780195055108
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199854219 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195055108.003.0005
Class, Culture, and Immigrant Group Identity in the United States: The Case of Irish-American Ethnicity

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Methods and Historiography

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter examines ethnicity, its origins, development, and consequences, with specific reference to Irish immigration and Irish America. It emphasizes class differences among Irish immigrants to explain both the dynamics of immigration and the resulting Irish-American culture. By 1900, Irish ethnic identity had achieved an ultimate synthesis: a “good Irish American” was at least one if not all of the following: a good Democrat, a practicing Catholic, a good family man or devoted wife and mother, in most cases a loyal union member, and nearly always at least a passive supporter of Ireland's “sacred cause.”

Keywords: Irish-American ethnicity; Irish America; immigration; Antonio Gramsci; Ireland

Chapter.  16364 words. 

Subjects: Methods and Historiography

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.