Chapter

Acceptable and Unacceptable Religious Grounds?

Kent Greenawalt

in Private Consciences and Public Reasons

Published in print August 1995 | ISBN: 9780195094190
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199853021 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195094190.003.0008
Acceptable and Unacceptable Religious Grounds?

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This chapter addresses the argument that rejects the widely held proposition that religious convictions are inherently nonrational or beyond reason and that religious convictions are subject to rational examination and are not beyond public scrutiny. The chapter makes a distinction between religious convictions that are unacceptable grounds for decision-making and those that are acceptable. The idea of arguing based on acceptable religious grounds is an idea of ecumenical politics, in which people speak to one another from their own traditions, but with sufficient basis in community and shared ideas to engage in genuine dialogue.

Keywords: acceptable religious grounds; unacceptable religious grounds; ecumenical politics; reason; rational examination; public scrutiny

Chapter.  4840 words. 

Subjects: Social and Political Philosophy

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