Chapter

Sex in the Sylvan Setting

Joel Williamson

in William Faulkner and Southern History

Published in print February 1996 | ISBN: 9780195101294
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199854233 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195101294.003.0011
Sex in the Sylvan Setting

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Most of all in his writings, William Faulkner focused on the tensions that work between men and women. What should a woman be, what should a man be, and what should they be together? In the South, that tension was terribly heightened by the impact of race and class. Faulkner was born into a Southern world that had a vision of itself as an organic society with a place for everyone. Regarding gender roles, the Victorian order in the South was remarkably clear. Women should be pious and pure, domestic and submissive. Men should protect their ladies physically. Also they should be the material protectors, the providers who “bring home the bacon” day by day for the comfortable support of their families.

Keywords: William Faulkner; South; Sylvan Setting; men; women; gender roles

Chapter.  17533 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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