Chapter

African-American Modernism, Signifyin(g), and Black Music

Samuel A. Floyd

in The Power of Black Music

Published in print January 1997 | ISBN: 9780195109757
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199853243 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195109757.003.0005
                   African-American Modernism, Signifyin(g), and Black Music

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This chapter discusses African American Modernism, Signifyin(g), and Black Music. Booker T. Washington's idea had raised opportunities among the black populace, perhaps even helping to bring about this spirit of “renaissancism,” this spirit of nationalistic engagement that began with intellectuals, artists, and spokespersons at the turn of the African American Modernism, Signifyin(g), and Black Music century. This spirit flourished in Harlem in the 1920s, engaging the entire African diaspora for more than four decades between around 1910 and 1950. During the Negro Renaissance, spirituals, ragtime, blues, jazz, and gospel music would go through significant development, and Signifyin(g) would play a role: the musicians would become signifiers par excellence—musical tricksters who would help define the music and the culture of the United States.

Keywords: Modernism; Signifyin(g); Black Music; Booker T. Washington

Chapter.  5400 words. 

Subjects: American Music

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