Chapter

Red-Letter Days: Christmas and the New American Calendar

Penne L. Restad

in Christmas in America

Published in print November 1997 | ISBN: 9780195109801
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199854073 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195109801.003.0002
Red-Letter Days: Christmas and the New American Calendar

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The American calendar celebrated very few holidays prior to its evolution and adaptation to the rest of the world. This book provides a comparison of different cultures and the different celebrations seen in America and the rest of Europe and England's other colonies. During the early 19th century, American calendars could be traced back to the pre-Revolutionary days, when no single calendar served all the colonists, resulting in a minute number of holidays celebrated by the land. This was the result of linguistic, ethnic, and regional diversities, where a sole nature and need was still unstable. During the revolution, the American calendar went through a lot of disparities, including their acceptance of the British holidays and their Gregorian calendar. As the nation became more entangled with industrialization, the recognition of holidays dwindled further, and in the 1800s only New Year's Eve, Thanksgiving, Independence Day, and Christmas had prominence.

Keywords: American calendar; New Year's Eve; Independence Day; Christmas; England colonies

Chapter.  4846 words. 

Subjects: Social and Cultural History

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