Chapter

On Understanding the Nature of Scientific Knowledge

Susan Carey and Carol Smith

in Software Goes to School

Published in print May 1997 | ISBN: 9780195115772
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199848041 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195115772.003.0003
On Understanding the Nature of Scientific Knowledge

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Understanding of the nature of scientific inquiry is the central topic of this section. The authors communicate their opposition to the usual textbook practice, and assert that science is not just a continuous collection of proven hypotheses, which only aims to satisfy the notions of inductive reasoning and empiricism. Despite the fact that students enter their classes with an inductivist epistemology in mind, it is suggested that collaborative study of the origin and the structure of science will help students absorb the conception that scientific researches investigate the world to look for evidences regarding a certain hypothesis in order to be aware of the underlying processes and interpretations of the present generation. In this regard, the constructivist epistemology or the transcendent realities of scientific knowledge will be propagated.

Keywords: scientific inquiry; scientific knowledge; science; constructivist epistemology; students; inductive reasoning; empiricism

Chapter.  6707 words. 

Subjects: Developmental Psychology

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