Chapter

Genetics and public health: informed consent beyond the clinical encounter

Nancy Press and Ellen Wright Clayton

in Genetics and Public Health in the 21st Century

Published in print September 2000 | ISBN: 9780195128307
Published online September 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780199864485 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195128307.003.0026

Series: Oxford Monographs on Medical Genetics

Genetics and public health: informed consent beyond the clinical encounter

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Public Health and Epidemiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter begins with a discussion of the barriers to adequate informed consent. It then presents examples that show how public health and genetics might come together, either in research or in clinical programs. The examples cover prenatal genetic screening, newborn screening programs, and the ways in which all genetics research inevitably involves families. It is argued that in designing modes of obtaining informed consent, explicit consideration must be given to the structural forces that may make truly informed consent difficult in each particular situation. Moreover, it must be realized that these structural forces have the potential to increase in importance and impact when coupled with any program that purports to have the public's health at stake.

Keywords: public health; informed consent; screening programs; families

Chapter.  10183 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.