Chapter

Separated from the World

Joen A. Carpenter

in Revive Us Again

Published in print July 1999 | ISBN: 9780195129076
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199853274 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195129076.003.0004
Separated from the World

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The most immediate sign and seal of fundamentalists' calling to come away from the world and from worldly Christianity was not their church membership but their commitment to live a “separated life.” During the 1930s and 1940s, fundamentalists were developing patterns of devotion and habits of thought that marked them, in both the biblical and ordinary sense of the word, as a peculiar people. The separated life for fundamentalists meant a variety of things, but most visible, of course, was their desire, in the midst of the Jazz Age, to uphold the behavioral standards of 19th-century evangelicalism. In addition to abiding by principles of strict sexual chastity and modesty in dress, fundamentalists were to abstain from alcoholic drink, profane or coarse language, social dancing, and the theater—including the movies.

Keywords: Christianity; fundamentalists; separatism; Bible; evangelicalism; behavioral standards

Chapter.  9330 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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