Chapter

Understanding Our Fundamental Nature

His Holiness the Dalai Lama

in Visions of Compassion

Published in print January 2002 | ISBN: 9780195130430
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199847327 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195130430.003.0005
Understanding Our Fundamental Nature

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The very nature of a person is predetermined in part by what location and culture he was born into. Every culture and society already has a preset of values, rules, and characteristics that shape an individual during his growth and development. This chapter introduces an ethical system such as democracy, responsibility, and individuality, attuned to what one perceives as what is good in human nature. What then, is the basic form of a human nature, one that is free from influences and external factors, one that is present when one has just been born? In addition to this, the way one looks at oneself, in terms of status, gender, and race affects how one acts in the society. It is an intricate web of both inherent and environmental factors that shape a person's individuality.

Keywords: nature; culture; society; environment; individuality

Chapter.  6334 words. 

Subjects: Social Psychology

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