Chapter

Coping with Sex, Drugs, and Violence

JOY G. DRYFOOS

in Safe Passage

Published in print January 2000 | ISBN: 9780195137859
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199846948 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195137859.003.0007
Coping with Sex, Drugs, and Violence

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This chapter reviews a few selected evaluated programs in three fields — delinquency, substance abuse, and teen pregnancy — and takes a look at programs in AIDS/HIV prevention. Many programs focus on increasing knowledge or changing attitudes. To determine whether a program really works, the methodology of evaluation research is examined. Multiple components have to be put together to strengthen the impact of the programs. Single-component efforts such as classroom curriculum or individual counseling are useful but not sufficient for changing the environment in which the high-risk behaviors are taking place. Most of the report cited also deal with policy issues. Violence prevention requires restrictions on the sale, purchase, and transfer of guns. Substance-abuse prevention calls for enforcement of law and taxes on cigarettes and alcohol. Teen pregnancy and HIV prevention depend on the availability of forms of birth control.

Keywords: sex; violence; delinquency prevention; substance-abuse prevention; Life Skills Training; teen pregnancy prevention; HIV prevention

Chapter.  9078 words. 

Subjects: Developmental Psychology

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