Chapter

Community and Interracial Activities “To break down the banter of race prejudice”

Linda O. McMurry

in To Keep the Waters Troubled

Published in print December 2000 | ISBN: 9780195139273
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199848911 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195139273.003.0014
Community and Interracial Activities “To break down the banter of race prejudice”

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This chapter describes Wells-Barnett's life in Chicago. For Wells-Barnett, Chicago's social problems were inspirations for activism. The city was experiencing growing pains that challenged city services and threatened racial tolerance. Housing and job competition created hostility that was beginning to erode black rights. Nevertheless, white reformers offered her new experiences of integration, and black protests frequently brought tangible results. Wells-Barnett began to spend more time in Chicago in 1896. At that time, she had two major outlets for her activism: the Conservator and the Ida B. Wells Club.

Keywords: housing competition; Chicago; activism; racial tolerance; integration; black protests; Conservator; job competition

Chapter.  7763 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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