Chapter

Prejudice, Protest, and Politics “When principle and prejudice come into collision”

Linda O. McMurry

in To Keep the Waters Troubled

Published in print December 2000 | ISBN: 9780195139273
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199848911 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195139273.003.0016
Prejudice, Protest, and Politics “When principle and prejudice come into collision”

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This chapter focuses on Wells-Barnett's fight against racism in American popular culture. Her leadership in the Negro Fellowship League (NFL) ensured that protest and politics would not be ignored. The league agitated against prejudice and injustice especially in Chicago and Illinois. To fight for rights on the national level, Wells-Barnett affiliated the organization with William Monroe Trotter's Equal Rights League in 1913. To promote political activity, the NFL hosted candidates' forums and urged voter participation. Many of Wells-Barnett's experiences confirmed her 1913 assertion that “when principle and prejudice come into collision, principle retires and leaves prejudice the victor.”

Keywords: Illinois; racism; Negro Fellowship League; protest; politics; prejudice; Chicago; William Monroe Trotter; Equal Rights League

Chapter.  7971 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of the Americas

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