Chapter

Rethinking the Fictive, Reclaiming the Real: Autobiography, Narrative Time, and the Burden of Truth

Mark Freeman

in Narrative and Consciousness

Published in print August 2003 | ISBN: 9780195140057
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780199847402 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195140057.003.0006
Rethinking the Fictive, Reclaiming the Real: Autobiography, Narrative Time, and the Burden of Truth

Show Summary Details

Preview

When the term fiction is used to refer to the processes involved in coming up with life narratives, this notion is often degraded, as it becomes parasitic to reality, and that reality is presented as something that is exceedingly narrow. Also, the notion of reality used here becomes problematic because such is associated with what is perceived to be the unconstructed and yet to be interpreted “real stuff” and that such is not without the notion of time which should be better linked with the world of people and that of things. This concept of reality involves events and other happenings that are beyond our control. Re-conceptualizing what is fictive in this case, however, opens the possibility for the restoration of more comprehensive meanings, but also for setting a different version of truth. This chapter looks into how attempts at composing autobiographies may distort some of these relevant aspects that then confuse the fictive with the real.

Keywords: fiction; reality; truth; time; autobiography

Chapter.  6408 words. 

Subjects: Cognitive Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.