Chapter

The Patriot: Political Readings of Hindu Identity in the Tales of Shivaji, 1869–2001

James W. Laine

in Shivaji

Published in print February 2003 | ISBN: 9780195141269
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849543 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195141269.003.0005
The Patriot: Political Readings of Hindu Identity in the Tales of Shivaji, 1869–2001

Show Summary Details

Preview

During the period of Bristish colonization, the British considered the political and cultural affairs of the nation in their concerns as they exiled the last peshwa and appointed a raja in 1818 before actually attaining sovereign control in 1848. Because this period is dominated by British supervision, the versions of Shivaji's legend that were retold at this time reflected a consciousness of European culture and power in a way similar to how earlier explanations reflected the Islamicate context. This chapter seeks to understand how the Shivaji legend contains an underlying nationalist discourse by looking into the sociological study of the common themes observed from the legend and in the actual places where events of Shivaji's life are remembered.

Keywords: British colonization; political affairs; cultural affairs; European culture; nationalist discourse; sociological study

Chapter.  11638 words. 

Subjects: Hinduism

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.