Chapter

Conclusion: Exceptions and the Rule

Mark David Spence

in Dispossessing the Wilderness

Published in print November 2000 | ISBN: 9780195142433
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199848812 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195142433.003.0010
Conclusion: Exceptions and the Rule

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If cooperation on cultural issues further tribal efforts to exercise some control over national park lands, this could revolutionize the way all Americans experience the wilderness. At Glacier National Park, for instance, full recognition of Blackfeet claims would make plain that the American preservationist ideal is predicated on Indian dispossession. Rather than idolize wilderness as a nonhuman landscape, where a person can be nothing more than “a visitor who does not remain,” national parks might provide new lessons about the degree to which cultural values and actions have always shaped the “natural world.”

Keywords: national park lands; wilderness; Glacier National Park; preservationist ideal

Chapter.  3601 words. 

Subjects: History of the Americas

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