Chapter

The Musical Cultures of Eighteenth-Century Germany

Kerala J. Snyder

in The Organ as A Mirror of Its Time

Published in print August 2002 | ISBN: 9780195144154
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849369 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195144154.003.0013
The Musical Cultures of Eighteenth-Century Germany

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This chapter explores the musical cultures of 18th-century Germany. The cultural life was dominated by countless large and small courts. The most marked alteration to the landscape of central Europe came through the tremendous growth in the number and size of so-called residential cities. A residential city was an urban community dependent on princely courts and often described by the foreign observers as parasitic and artificial. The residential cities became incubators of a new social group, which one calls middle class only at the cost of misconstruing its means of existence and relationship to public life. This group was interposed between the nobility and the lower classes and derived its social and economic identity not from commerce and industry but from state service.

Keywords: musical cultures; Germany; princely courts; residential cities; central Europe

Chapter.  8026 words. 

Subjects: Musicology and Music History

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