Chapter

1889–1890 Carpets, Etc.

Michael Ainger

in Gilbert and Sullivan

Published in print November 2002 | ISBN: 9780195147698
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780199849437 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195147698.003.0026
1889–1890 Carpets, Etc.

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Arthur Sullivan could not agree with William Gilbert about the renewal of carpets and the responsibility of preliminary expenses, but he undertook to arrange a meeting with Richard D'Oyly Carte at Queen's Mansions for “calm deliberation,” without any mention of what had taken place in their heated conversation. Sullivan wanted to let the matter stand over for a week; he was going out of town and the delay would tend to smooth matters. Sullivan's solution appears reasonable. He was able to shelve problems in this way, and anyway he wanted to go up to Newmarket for the races, where he had been invited to stay with his friend Russie Walker. Gilbert's temperament was completely the opposite. He would constantly worry at a problem, working himself more firmly into a feeling of self-righteousness until the problem was resolved, if necessary, in a court of law.

Keywords: Arthur Sullivan; William Gilbert; carpets; expenses; Richard D'Oyly Carte; Newmarket; races; Russie Walker; court; law

Chapter.  7129 words. 

Subjects: Popular Music

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